A hybrid model reflects a decision by management to allow employees to work part of their work time on campus and part away from campus (remote).

 

For Managers

Guidance and Resources

When is it appropriate to use a hybrid model

  • Your area/department is the type of function where people often work from home. In your industry, this is a standard. Consider recruitment and retention implications.
  • Your area is already set up well to allow a hybrid model (equipment, technology already established). There is not a significant extra business cost. 
  • Roles are not front-facing with customers onsite; they can be done with remote interaction (not in person); they can easily be supported by technology; works especially well with single contributor roles that require high concentration.
  • This may be positive for the morale of your staff.

Considerations when deciding on and implementing a hybrid model

  • Consider cost and equipment. Do people have equipment and technology support both at home and at work to be productive? 
  • What do I need to have in place for employees to be successful in such a model (collaborative tools for remote and onsite teams, clear expectations on remote/onsite schedules and duties)? For resources and support for remote work, visit the remote work web page.
  • How does it impact on-campus service? Does it affect their availability to serve constituents on campus? Consider the need for your group to deliver its services onsite, as well as the impact a hybrid model may have on overall visibility. 
  • Does it change the nature of collaboration and conversation among work groups? If so, does that effect the team’s ability to accomplish its work? As your area adapts, consider the change in employee’s ability to work as normal and meet deadlines as they adjust to a new routine.
  • How does this effect the cadence of meeting schedules in my area?
  • Consider the recruitment and retention concern, as many more employees are allowing employees to work from home. 
  • Consider the benefit and impact on employees and how they wish to work.
  • Are you aware of all of the well-being and work-life support resources? View the employee well-being hub for mental health, family care, wellness and other support resources to help employees thrive, personally and professionally.
  • While your overall area may be on a hybrid model, each operating unit may make local decisions regarding number of days onsite or at home. Prioritize the optimal days to be onsite vs remote based on business needs.

    How is this different from saying employees work on campus with a few days remote on occasion? 

    • Make a decision to use a hybrid model – this determines how much time and when employees are on campus vs remote. It is the normal operating model for the department. 
    • Hybrid schedule is determined under a plan and in writing. 
    • What’s not hybrid: Employees ask to work from home on occasion vs having a set schedule. It is not intended for an otherwise onsite employee to ask for approval for occasional remote work. This is an exception vs the norm.

    Technology, productivity and collaboration considerations

    • Do people have equipment and technology support both at home and at work to be productive?
    • How does this effect the cadence of meeting schedules in my area?
    • Does it change the nature of collaboration and conversation among work groups? If so, does that effect the team’s ability to accomplish its work?
    • How does it impact on-campus service? Does it effect their availability to serve constituents on campus?
    • What do I need to have in place for employees to be successful in such a model (collaborative tools for remote and onsite teams, clear expectations on remote/onsite schedules and duties)? For resources and support for remote work, visit the remote work web page.
    • Are you aware of all of the well-being and work-life support resources? View the employee well-being hub for mental health, family care, wellness and other support resources to help employees thrive, personally and professionally.

    How is this different from saying employees work on campus with a few days remote on occasion? 


     

    For Employees

    Guidance and Resources

    Considerations

    • I’m interested in working under a hybrid model. What steps do I take? Talk to your manager and have an open conversation about your role, the business needs and how you can balance work in this hybrid model.
    • If I’m in a hybrid model, can I change the days I work on campus vs work remotely? Talk to your manager about scheduling that provides optimal onsite service and capability to working from home on certain days. Note that your manager will have to balance your request with the request of other team members working in this format in order to have a common, equitable approach for everyone.
    • Can you sustain this model? How does this routine fit your role and productivity? Consider your personal and professional needs, as well as your ability to achieve success in your role. Consider your set up at home (technology, your ability to connect with your team) as well as your lifestyle, personal time and home circumstances.
    • What is the impact of working at home on your health? View resources and guidance on finding balance, taking care of your health and setting up a routine that works for you and your job. The university has many resources to support your well-being, including mental health, family care and wellness.
    • Finding balance between work and personal time is important. 

     

     

    Additional Resources

    Remote Work

    Remote work resources and tools are available to WashU employees and managers to help navigate and carry out work offsite. 

    Well-being Support

    View the employee well-being hub for mental health, wellness and other well-being resources.

    Family Care

    View the family care hub or resources, support and guidance.